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Lauren Langlois

Lauren Langlois first joined Chunky Move to collaborate with choreographer Antony Hamilton on his work Keep Everything (2012), commissioned as part of the Next Move program in 2012. Since then, she has performed in Anouk van Dijk’s productions L U C I D (2016), Complexity of Belonging (2014), 247 Days (2013) and An Act of Now (2012).

Langlois joined the Australian Dance Theatre in 2008, performing and touring in two of the company’s major works G and Be Your Self. She also worked with Lina Limosani on The Tighter you Squeeze, Antony Hamilton on RGB, Larissa McGowan on SlackZero-Sum and Scrap and performed several times with ADT on Channel 10’s hit TV show So You Think You Can Dance.

In 2011, Langlois joined the Sydney Dance Company and worked with choreographer/director Rafael Bonachela, performing in LANDforms, Raw Models, 6 Breaths, We Unfold, The Land of Yes and The Land of No.

In 2013, she toured Larissa McGowan’s piece Skeleton to the Dublin Dance Festival and performed in Stephanie Lake’s A Small Prometheus for the Melbourne Festival, before embarking on a national tour of Keep Everything in 2014. In 2015 she appeared in Antony Hamilton’s NYX for the Melbourne Festival, and Prue Lang’s DanceMassive work SPACEPROJECT.

Langlois received the 2015 Green Room Award in the category of Best Female Dancer for her performance in Complexity of Belonging. She was also nominated in 2014 for her work in Chunky Move’s 247 Days. Her performance in Keep Everything earned her nominations in the same category for Green Room, Helpmann, and Australian Dance Awards.

Langlois completed a full time course in classical ballet at the Marie Walton-Mahon Dance Academy and studied contemporary dance at the New Zealand School of Dance.

Class with Lauren

Countertechnique is an expansive process. I have found greater ease, flexibility, and strength, as well as a finer balance of instinct and technical decision-making. It allows you to choose what works for you, and let go of anything that doesn’t. This freedom creates autonomy and enables the dancer to better express themselves artistically. Additionally, it works for dancers of every level. As a teacher, I want to help dancers find ways to ease unnecessary pressure they may put on themselves. Countertechnique encourages the dancer to continually explore the possibilities of what they might be capable of, and provides a playful, rigorous class environment in which to flirt with these boundaries.